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eMusic Queer CD of the Week

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I’ve been trying to find the perfect queer holiday CD and it’s not been easy. I’ve listened to George Michael’s “Last Christmas” way too much recently, and I usually spend this whole season trying to avoid things that are too overtly merry. The obvious solution, then, would be to find something that signifies an honest spirit of the season without making me want to hang myself on a giant candy cane. I keep coming back to Hedwig and the Angry Inch.

eMusic Queer CD of the Week »

His live shows — a dramatic mix of sincere emotion and formal wear — echoed this as well, like a living embodiment of a queer teenage boy’s idealized vision of what gay life will be like outside his parents attic. On Patrick Wolf’s most recent album, this year’s Bachelor, he seems to find out that not everything is cummerbunds and violins. His aesthetic touch points shift from YM Magazine to Nylon. “Wind in the Willows” fairy tale flourish gives way to a near-electro sheen and an overall sense of someone, as they say, getting what they want and never wanting it again.

eMusic Queer CD of the Week, Music »

In some bands, the many different members unite to form such a tight hybrid of sound and style that there are no individuals, just a unit of sound. The Gossip is not one of those bands. Though every member of the post-punk/rock/R&B fusion trio rocks in their own way, they are carried by one of contemporary musics most kick-ass queer frontwoman. Beth Ditto sings like Robert Plant, commands an audience like Santigold and stage dives like a drunken soccer fan.

eMusic Queer CD of the Week »

While short-statured, muscly gay Jewish boys aren’t usually associated with music that moves the booty, everything about P.D.A. is designed either for dancing or making love. The former member of “Yoo hoo”-makers Imperial Teen covers Architecture in Helsinki (“Heart it Races”) or busts a Timbaland worthy ode to doing it (“Double Fantasy II”) with equal aplomb. In respect to the latter track, its always a blast to hear standard R & B when you know that its sung from one guy to another. No homo.

eMusic Queer CD of the Week »

His newest work, Origin:Orphan retains that ability to excite the genitals in songs like “Underage,” but there is a nice variety throughout it as well. As its highest praise, some of the albums harmonies are so catchy that you might not even realize the lyrics are there until the third spin. “In The NA” nearly requires an exorcism to remove from your lobes, and “The Little Bit” builds an earworm by seemingly adding lyrics to the “Hhmmm, Hmmm” bridge of “You Can Call Me Al.” It might sound unlikely, but you”ll believe me when you hear it.

eMusic Queer CD of the Week »

What the average fan might not know, however, is that Telepathe’s members, Busy Gangnes and Melissa Livaudais, used to be an item. Their nonchalance at this fact haven’t given them as much purchase in the queer press as one might expect (one superior interview notwithstanding,) but finding out a band’s sexuality through a casual sentence in a Pitchfork review carries its own kind of visibility too.

eMusic Queer CD of the Week »

The Blow, really Khaela Maricich, doesn’t explicitly wear its queerness on 2006′s Paper Television. But when you do find out that Maricich is an out lesbian something about the rest of the album shifts into focus. Rather than a collection of over-arching anthems to love and loss, the album charts the trajectory of a relationship through a series of moments and observations that suggest they come from a uniquely different perspective.

eMusic Queer CD of the Week »

Though he’s not often heralded in the gay canon with contemporaries like Sylvester, Velvet Underground frontman Lou Reed released the best, and queerest, album of his solo career with 1972′s Transformer. No one glamorizes the underbelly quite like Lou does, and the New York he creates in Transformer is one of drugs, parties and more kinds of sex than I could print here without being brought up on obscenities charges. While his career with the Velvet’s hinted at gay themes in songs like “New Age” and “Candy Says,” that theme of his writing explodes throughout Transformer’s blacklit halls.